Walking as a Mode of Transport

Using a Peer Research Methodology to Investigate Children’s Mobility Challenges in Secondary Cities in Ghana and Liberia: A Comparative Study of Cape Coast and Ganta

(WK-2023-EP-2)Project Leader: Jack JenkinsDept of Anthropology, Durham University, South Road, Durham, UK. Partners: Abstract This project investigates children’s daily mobility challenges in two secondary cites in West Africa – Cape Coast, Ghana and Ganta, Liberia. Using participatory peer research methods, children aged 9-18 will be trained as co-researchers to explore children’s walking experiences in growing

Inequality in Walking the 24 hour city: temporality, intersectionality and the embodied experience in Dar es Salaam, Tshwane and Cardiff

WK-2023-EP-03Project Leader: Margot RubinsSpatial Planning, School of Geography and Planning, Cardiff University, UK Partners: Abstract: Walking as a mode of transport is unequally accessed and experienced. Intersectional factors of identity such as race, class, ethnicity and gender, to name a few, influence the ways in which walking is practiced and how different people navigate and

Walking across borders: exploring challenges to walkability in the Global South

WK-2023-EP-08Project Leader: Joseph FerreiraDept of Urban Studies and Planning, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA, Partners: Abstract: Climate change and public health concerns are increasingly necessitating more attention to non-auto modes of transport. By improving walking infrastructure and enhancing the pedestrian experience, we can not only increase walking trips but also transit ridership. The literature

From accessibility measures to the understanding of walkability

WK-2023-EP-04Project Leader: Juan Pablo Ospina ZapataSchool of Applied Sciences and Engineering, Universidad EAFIT, Chile. Partners: Abstract: In many cities in the Global South, particularly in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC), urban planning often suffers from inequalities and segregation in land use and population distribution. Additionally, while accessibility measurement has advanced in other contexts, many

Exploring the Personal Burden and Value of Pedestrian Experiences of Women from Low Income Backgrounds in Nairobi and Dar–Salaam

WK-2023-EP-09Project leader: Violet WavireKenyatta University, School of Education, Kenya. Partners: Abstract: Due to urban population growth, poor city planning and poverty, urban low income women in major African cities have been marginalized from formal transport systems comprising private cars, taxis and motorcycle transport services. They comprise the over half of the population of people who

Walking to School in Latin America

WK-2023-EP-10Project leader:Alexandra Krstikj,School of Architecture, Art and Design, Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey State of Mexico, Mexico Partners: Abstract: Despite walking being ubiquitous in Latin America, we know very little regarding walking behaviors and conditions in which these walking trips take place. Even less is known regarding walking equity and children, even

Crime, perceived insecurity and the walking behaviours of older people: a comparative study in Chile and Mexico

WK-2023-EP-11Project Leader: Giovanni VecchioInstituto de Estudios Urbanos y Territoriales, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile. Partners: Abstract Previously localised in Global North countries, population ageing is rapidly involving also the Global South. For older people, the possibility of getting out of the house and walking in one’s neighbourhood to access basic opportunities is crucial for

Measuring Walkability: A Comprehensive Index for Enhancing Pedestrian-Friendly Environments in Latin American Cities

WK-2023-EP-12Ana Margarita, Larranaga UriarteUniversidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, School of Engineering, Laboratory of Transport Systems, (LASTRAN), Porto Alegre, Brazil. Abstract Walking is a prevalent mode of transportation in Latin American cities, yet it often lacks the priority it deserves in public policies. Cultural, institutional, and infrastructure barriers hinder walkability, exacerbating social and economic